Food

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Food & Drink

Composting in the High Desert

Wood Pallet Compost Bin

Eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables is one part of living a healthy lifestyle. Eating all of those fruits and veggies produces a lot of seeds, cores, peels and husks. Some people think that leftover fruit and veggie bits are trash and don't realize what they could be - fertile, organic soil. Composting may be the perfect use for fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds, tea leaves, spoiled foods, yard waste and other organic materials that would otherwise end up in a landfill.

Why I Garden #5

Planting Garlic

Allium sativum L.

Planting 10 cloves of Bosque Early Garlic from the Santa Fe Farmer's Market ( a little late I know ) for harvest next year. Hopefully.

Why I Garden #4

Indian Popcorn ears

We've had the first hard freeze of the season, so the garden is done for the year. Unfortunately, a few green tomatoes went straight to the compost bin as I didn't pull them early enough. Now it's time to turn the compost and start planning for next year.

Here are a few colorful ears of Indian Popcorn that we'll be popping pretty soon.

Why I Garden #3

Indian Popcorn on the stalk

Indian Popcorn maturing on the stalk

Why I Garden #1

Delicata Squash, Amish Paste Tomatoes and Purple Pod Beans

Delicata Winter Squash, Amish Paste Tomatoes and Purple Pod String Beans.

Paper or Plastic? Canvas!

Canvas Tote Bags

Paper or Plastic? I'm asked that simple question about once a week and I now have a better answer - Canvas. I've known for a while that neither paper or plastic is a great shopping bag choice. Paper bags, as they are currently produced in the U.S., require cutting down about 14 million trees each year. The 30 billion plastic bags Americans use each year require 12 million barrels of crude oil for their manufacture. Why not short-circuit the debate between the lesser of the two evils and use a canvas bag?

Food Fresh from the Farm

Farmers Market Apples and Peaches

Supermarkets have become strangely fantastical places where fruits and vegetables are always in season and always available. Unfortunately, the fruits and vegetables are rarely truly fresh and the varieties have become very uniform across the nation. Of course, fruits can't be picked when they're fully ripe if they must be shipped hundreds or thousands of miles. Many heirloom vegetables, especially tomatoes, don't ship well at all, so the supermarkets only stock the types that can withstand early picking and long-distance trucking.

Fresh from the Tap

Drinking Fountain

How is it that so many people want water from their beer from a tap, but they want their water to come in a bottle? Well, folks who know and love beer extol the quality and flavor that comes from a keg rather than a bottle. I'll talk about beer another day, but interestingly enough, water from the tap also has advantages over water from a bottle. Water from a municipal tap is tested more often and more extensively, it is from nearby source(s), uses no packaging and is radically cheaper than water from a bottle.

Food from the Backyard - Edible Weeds

We all know how important eating fresh greens is, but those bags of "mixed greens" in the grocery store can be a bit pricey. Well, of course you can grow your own salad greens, but sometimes nature provides fresh greens in unexpected places. For instance, your front lawn.

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